Friday, November 17, 2017

How do rigid gender roles in labour outcomes of rural environment impact women?

Work activities of women and men in rural areas primarily revolve around land and related resources. In addition to these activities, every household has the minimum amount of housework for carrying on its day-to-day activities. The household constitutes a basic unit of production in all such societies where agricultural production depends almost entirely on the use of family labour. The activities associated with agriculture are considered of prime importance while associated activities such as the management and care of livestock are considered of secondary importance since they are an additional source of income but are not the chief source of livelihood. Another area of work is household work, an activity where the labour of the individuals is not paid for, as it is performed for one’s own family.
It is quite often seen that in patriarchal societies, men are assigned those types of activities which have a direct exchange value and therefore the work of women is considered of little or no exchange value and is considered less important.
In the sex-based segmentation of labour, some activities are generally restricted to men and others to women. Agricultural activity is regarded as a man’s job and animal husbandry and housework as a woman’s jobs.
The activities performed by women on farm or in the household are generally not considered to be economically productive and are unpaid. 
A recently published article on Unequal Sharing of Domestic Work from the 'Indian Journal of Gender Studies' focusses on the permanence of traditional intra-household gender disparities in the distribution of work within the household. These values are transferred to the next generation as young girls are expected to help their mothers in carrying out domestic duties and care work, while boys have no such obligation.

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